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Ice hockey regeln

ice hockey regeln

Die Eishockeyregeln sind im offiziellen Regelbuch (engl. Rulebook) der Internationalen . Diese sind unterteilt in Spiel-Offizielle und Off-Ice-Offizielle. Aug. Eishockeyregeln im Überblick: Was Sie wissen müssen - Wer mitreden will, sollte sich auch mit den Zonen, Abseits und unerlaubtem. Eishockey ist eine Mannschaftssportart, die mit fünf Feldspielern und einem Torwart auf einer . Mittels so genannter Bodychecks ist es möglich, den Gegner den Regeln entsprechend seitlich zu verdrängen oder .. Die Asia League Ice Hockey gilt als spielstärkste Eishockeyliga außerhalb Nordamerikas und Europas und. Fill out the contact form below and someone Beste Spielothek in Ober Steinach finden AZ Ice will contact you soon - please indicate in your message which of our 3 rinks you are inquiring about. The origins of ice hockey date back to the 19th century in Canada where adaptations of the modern day hockey game were played in icy conditions. Fighting within the game geldspielautomaten kostenlos spielen ohne anmeldung also send a message to players Beste Spielothek in Brugg finden coaches from other teams that cheap shots, dirty plays, and targeting specific players will not be tolerated and there will be consequences involved. Durch die Nutzung dieser Website erklären Sie sich mit den Nutzungsbedingungen und der Datenschutzrichtlinie einverstanden. Archived from the original PDF on Casino am neckar NHA would further refine the rules: The six "dream teams" were automatically placed in the final round of eight; the two remaining slots were filled by the winners of a qualifying round. The goal cage is 4 feet 1. Defensemen usually stay on the ice for Beste Spielothek in Schrotsdorf finden slightly longer period of time. On His Own Side of the Puck.

Ice Hockey Regeln Video

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regeln ice hockey -

Die Tore sind rot gekennzeichnet und messen 1,83 m in der Breite sowie 1,22 m in der Höhe. In der Regel bestehen diese aus fünf Feldspielern und einem Torwart , in besonderen Situationen wird der Torwart aber auch durch einen weiteren Feldspieler ersetzt. Darüber hinaus sind die Frauen, genauso wie alle Nachwuchsspieler, verpflichtet, mit Helmen mit Gesichtsschutz zu spielen. Nach Ablauf der Strafen wird bei der nächsten Unterbrechung die Feldspieleranzahl wieder auf 4 gebracht. Da die Torhüter durch die auf das Tor abgefeuerten Schüsse einer erhöhten Gefahr ausgesetzt sind, haben sie eine noch umfassendere Schutzausrüstung. In der ersten Runde trifft die nach dem Grunddurchgang am besten platzierte Mannschaft gegen die am schlechtesten platzierte, die zweitbeste auf die zweitschlechteste usw. Durch die Nutzung dieser Website erklären Sie sich mit den Nutzungsbedingungen und der Datenschutzrichtlinie einverstanden.

After re-organizing as the National Hockey League in , the league expanded into the United States, starting with the Boston Bruins in Professional hockey leagues developed later in Europe, but amateur leagues leading to national championships were in place.

One of the first was the Swiss National League A , founded in Today, professional leagues have been introduced in most countries of Europe.

While the general characteristics of the game stay the same wherever it is played, the exact rules depend on the particular code of play being used.

Ice hockey is played on a hockey rink. During normal play, there are six players per side on the ice at any time, one of them being the goaltender, each of whom is on ice skates.

The objective of the game is to score goals by shooting a hard vulcanized rubber disc, the puck , into the opponent's goal net, which is placed at the opposite end of the rink.

The players use their sticks to pass or shoot the puck. Within certain restrictions, players may redirect the puck with any part of their body.

Players may not hold the puck in their hand and are prohibited from using their hands to pass the puck to their teammates, unless they are in the defensive zone.

Players are also prohibited from kicking the puck into the opponent's goal, though unintentional redirections off the skate are permitted.

Players may not intentionally bat the puck into the net with their hands. Hockey is an " off-side " game, meaning that forward passes are allowed, unlike in rugby.

Before the s hockey was an on-side game, meaning that only backward passes were allowed. Those rules favoured individual stick-handling as a key means of driving the puck forward.

With the arrival of offside rules, the forward pass transformed hockey into a truly team sport, where individual performance diminished in importance relative to team play, which could now be coordinated over the entire surface of the ice as opposed to merely rearward players.

The six players on each team are typically divided into three forwards, two defencemen, and a goaltender. The term skaters is typically used to describe all players who are not goaltenders.

The forward positions consist of a centre and two wingers: Forwards often play together as units or lines , with the same three forwards always playing together.

The defencemen usually stay together as a pair generally divided between left and right. Left and right side wingers or defencemen are generally positioned as such, based on the side on which they carry their stick.

A substitution of an entire unit at once is called a line change. Teams typically employ alternate sets of forward lines and defensive pairings when shorthanded or on a power play.

The goaltender stands in a, usually blue, semi-circle called the crease in the defensive zone keeping pucks from going in. Substitutions are permitted at any time during the game, although during a stoppage of play the home team is permitted the final change.

When players are substituted during play, it is called changing on the fly. A new NHL rule added in the —06 season prevents a team from changing their line after they ice the puck.

The boards surrounding the ice help keep the puck in play and they can also be used as tools to play the puck. Players are permitted to " bodycheck " opponents into the boards as a means of stopping progress.

The referees, linesmen and the outsides of the goal are "in play" and do not cause a stoppage of the game when the puck or players are influenced by either bouncing or colliding into them.

Play can be stopped if the goal is knocked out of position. Play often proceeds for minutes without interruption.

When play is stopped, it is restarted with a " faceoff ". Two players "face" each other and an official drops the puck to the ice, where the two players attempt to gain control of the puck.

Markings circles on the ice indicate the locations for the faceoff and guide the positioning of players. The three major rules of play in ice hockey that limit the movement of the puck: A player is "offside" if he enters his opponent's zone before the puck itself.

Under many situations, a player may not "ice the puck", shoot the puck all the way across both the centre line and the opponent's goal line.

The puck goes "out of play" whenever it goes past the perimeter of the ice rink onto the player benches, over the "glass," or onto the protective netting above the glass and a stoppage of play is called by the officials using whistles.

It also does not matter if the puck comes back onto the ice surface from those areas as the puck is considered dead once it leaves the perimeter of the rink.

Under IIHF rules, each team may carry a maximum of 20 players and two goaltenders on their roster. NHL rules restrict the total number of players per game to 18, plus two goaltenders.

In the NHL, the players are usually divided into four lines of three forwards, and into three pairs of defencemen.

On occasion, teams may elect to substitute an extra defenceman for a forward. The seventh defenceman may play as a substitute defenceman, spend the game on the bench, or if a team chooses to play four lines then this seventh defenceman may see ice-time on the fourth line as a forward.

A professional game consists of three "periods" of twenty minutes, the clock running only when the puck is in play. The teams change ends after each period of play, including overtime.

Recreational leagues and children's leagues often play shorter games, generally with three shorter periods of play. Various procedures are used if a tie occurs.

In tournament play, as well as in the NHL playoffs, North Americans favour sudden death overtime , in which the teams continue to play twenty-minute periods until a goal is scored.

Up until the — season regular season NHL games were settled with a single five-minute sudden death period with five players plus a goalie per side, with both teams awarded one point in the standings in the event of a tie.

With a goal, the winning team would be awarded two points and the losing team none just as if they had lost in regulation.

From — until —04, the National Hockey League decided ties by playing a single five-minute sudden death overtime period with each team having four skaters per side plus the goalie to "open up" the game.

In the event of a tie, each team would still receive one point in the standings but in the event of a victory the winning team would be awarded two points in the standings and the losing team one point.

The idea was to discourage teams from playing for a tie, since previously some teams might have preferred a tie and 1 point to risking a loss and zero points.

The only exception to this rule is if a team opts to pull their goalie in exchange for an extra skater during overtime and is subsequently scored upon an "empty net" goal , in which case the losing team receives no points for the overtime loss.

Since the —16 season, the single five-minute sudden death overtime session involves three skaters on each side. Since three skaters must always be on the ice in an NHL game, the consequences of penalties are slightly different from those during regulation play.

If a team is on a powerplay when overtime begins, that team will play with more than three skaters usually four, very rarely five until the expiration of the penalty.

Any penalty during overtime that would result in a team losing a skater during regulation instead causes the non-penalized team to add a skater.

Once the penalized team's penalty ends, the number of skaters on each side is adjusted accordingly, with the penalized team adding a skater in regulation and the non-penalized team subtracting a skater in overtime.

This goes until the next stoppage of play. International play and several North American professional leagues, including the NHL in the regular season , now use an overtime period identical to that from 99—00 — 03—04 followed by a penalty shootout.

If the score remains tied after an extra overtime period, the subsequent shootout consists of three players from each team taking penalty shots.

After these six total shots, the team with the most goals is awarded the victory. If the score is still tied, the shootout then proceeds to a sudden death format.

Regardless of the number of goals scored during the shootout by either team, the final score recorded will award the winning team one more goal than the score at the end of regulation time.

In the NHL if a game is decided in overtime or by a shootout the winning team is awarded two points in the standings and the losing team is awarded one point.

Ties no longer occur in the NHL. The overtime mode for the NHL playoffs differ from the regular season. In the playoffs there are no shootouts nor ties.

If a game is tied after regulation an additional 20 minutes of 5 on 5 sudden death overtime will be added. In case of a tied game after the overtime, multiple minute overtimes will be played until a team scores, which wins the match.

In ice hockey, infractions of the rules lead to play stoppages whereby the play is restarted at a face off. Some infractions result in the imposition of a penalty to a player or team.

In the simplest case, the offending player is sent to the " penalty box " and their team has to play with one less player on the ice for a designated amount of time.

Minor penalties last for two minutes, major penalties last for five minutes, and a double minor penalty is two consecutive penalties of two minutes duration.

A single minor penalty may be extended by a further two minutes for causing visible injury to the victimized player.

This is usually when blood is drawn during high sticking. Players may be also assessed personal extended penalties or game expulsions for misconduct in addition to the penalty or penalties their team must serve.

The team that has been given a penalty is said to be playing "short-handed" while the opposing team is on a " power play ".

A two-minute minor penalty is often charged for lesser infractions such as " tripping ", " elbowing ", " roughing ", " high-sticking ", " delay of the game ", " too many players on the ice ", " boarding ", illegal equipment, " charging " leaping into an opponent or body-checking him after taking more than two strides , "holding", holding the stick grabbing an opponent's stick , "interference", " hooking ", " slashing ", "kneeing", "unsportsmanlike conduct" arguing a penalty call with referee, extremely vulgar or inappropriate verbal comments , "butt-ending" striking an opponent with the knob of the stick—a very rare penalty , "spearing", or " cross-checking ".

As of the — season, a minor penalty is also assessed for " diving ", where a player embellishes or simulates an offence. More egregious fouls may be penalized by a four-minute double-minor penalty, particularly those that injure the victimized player.

These penalties end either when the time runs out or when the other team scores during the power play. In the case of a goal scored during the first two minutes of a double-minor, the penalty clock is set down to two minutes upon a score, effectively expiring the first minor penalty.

Five-minute major penalties are called for especially violent instances of most minor infractions that result in intentional injury to an opponent, or when a "minor" penalty results in visible injury such as bleeding , as well as for fighting.

Major penalties are always served in full; they do not terminate on a goal scored by the other team. Major penalties assessed for fighting are typically offsetting, meaning neither team is short-handed and the players exit the penalty box upon a stoppage of play following the expiration of their respective penalties.

The foul of "boarding" defined as "check[ing] an opponent in such a manner that causes the opponent to be thrown violently in the boards" [57] is penalized either by a minor or major penalty at the discretion of the referee, based on the violent state of the hit.

A minor or major penalty for boarding is often assessed when a player checks an opponent from behind and into the boards. Some varieties of penalties do not always require the offending team to play a man short.

Concurrent five-minute major penalties in the NHL usually result from fighting. In the case of two players being assessed five-minute fighting majors, both the players serve five minutes without their team incurring a loss of player both teams still have a full complement of players on the ice.

This differs with two players from opposing sides getting minor penalties, at the same time or at any intersecting moment, resulting from more common infractions.

In this case, both teams will have only four skating players not counting the goaltender until one or both penalties expire if one penalty expires before the other, the opposing team gets a power play for the remainder of the time ; this applies regardless of current pending penalties.

However, in the NHL, a team always has at least three skaters on the ice. Thus, ten-minute misconduct penalties are served in full by the penalized player, but his team may immediately substitute another player on the ice unless a minor or major penalty is assessed in conjunction with the misconduct a two-and-ten or five-and-ten.

In this case, the team designates another player to serve the minor or major; both players go to the penalty box, but only the designee may not be replaced, and he is released upon the expiration of the two or five minutes, at which point the ten-minute misconduct begins.

In addition, game misconducts are assessed for deliberate intent to inflict severe injury on an opponent at the officials' discretion , or for a major penalty for a stick infraction or repeated major penalties.

The offending player is ejected from the game and must immediately leave the playing surface he does not sit in the penalty box ; meanwhile, if an additional minor or major penalty is assessed, a designated player must serve out of that segment of the penalty in the box similar to the above-mentioned "two-and-ten".

In some rare cases, a player may receive up to nineteen minutes in penalties for one string of plays. This could involve receiving a four-minute double minor penalty, getting in a fight with an opposing player who retaliates, and then receiving a game misconduct after the fight.

In this case, the player is ejected and two teammates must serve the double-minor and major penalties.

A " penalty shot " is awarded to a player when the illegal actions of another player stop a clear scoring opportunity, most commonly when the player is on a " breakaway ".

A penalty shot allows the obstructed player to pick up the puck on the centre red-line and attempt to score on the goalie with no other players on the ice, to compensate for the earlier missed scoring opportunity.

A penalty shot is also awarded for a defender other than the goaltender covering the puck in the goal crease, a goaltender intentionally displacing his own goal posts during a breakaway to avoid a goal, a defender intentionally displacing his own goal posts when there is less than two minutes to play in regulation time or at any point during overtime, or a player or coach intentionally throwing a stick or other object at the puck or the puck carrier and the throwing action disrupts a shot or pass play.

Officials also stop play for puck movement violations, such as using one's hands to pass the puck in the offensive end, but no players are penalized for these offences.

The sole exceptions are deliberately falling on or gathering the puck to the body, carrying the puck in the hand, and shooting the puck out of play in one's defensive zone all penalized two minutes for delay of game.

In the NHL, a unique penalty applies to the goalies. The goalies now are forbidden to play the puck in the "corners" of the rink near their own net.

This will result in a two-minute penalty against the goalie's team. Only in the area in-front of the goal line and immediately behind the net marked by two red lines on either side of the net the goalie can play the puck.

An additional rule that has never been a penalty, but was an infraction in the NHL before recent rules changes, is the " two-line offside pass ".

Prior to the —06 NHL season, play was stopped when a pass from inside a team's defending zone crossed the centre line, with a face-off held in the defending zone of the offending team.

Players are now able to pass to teammates who are more than the blue and centre ice red line away. The NHL has taken steps to speed up the game of hockey and create a game of finesse, by retreating from the past when illegal hits, fights, and "clutching and grabbing" among players were commonplace.

Rules are now more strictly enforced, resulting in more penalties, which in turn provides more protection to the players and facilitates more goals being scored.

The governing body for United States' amateur hockey has implemented many new rules to reduce the number of stick-on-body occurrences, as well as other detrimental and illegal facets of the game "zero tolerance".

In men's hockey, but not in women's, a player may use his hip or shoulder to hit another player if the player has the puck or is the last to have touched it.

This use of the hip and shoulder is called " body checking ". Not all physical contact is legal—in particular, hits from behind, hits to the head and most types of forceful stick-on-body contact are illegal.

A delayed penalty call occurs when a penalty offence is committed by the team that does not have possession of the puck. In this circumstance the team with possession of the puck is allowed to complete the play; that is, play continues until a goal is scored, a player on the opposing team gains control of the puck, or the team in possession commits an infraction or penalty of their own.

Because the team on which the penalty was called cannot control the puck without stopping play, it is impossible for them to score a goal.

In these cases, the team in possession of the puck can pull the goalie for an extra attacker without fear of being scored on. However, it is possible for the controlling team to mishandle the puck into their own net.

If a delayed penalty is signalled and the team in possession scores, the penalty is still assessed to the offending player, but not served.

In college games, the penalty is still enforced even if the team in possession scores. A typical game of hockey is governed by two to four officials on the ice, charged with enforcing the rules of the game.

There are typically two linesmen who are mainly responsible for calling "offside" and " icing " violations, breaking up fights, and conducting faceoffs, [59] and one or two referees , [60] who call goals and all other penalties.

Linesmen can, however, report to the referee s that a penalty should be assessed against an offending player in some situations.

On-ice officials are assisted by off-ice officials who act as goal judges, time keepers, and official scorers. The most widespread system in use today is the "three-man system," that uses one referee and two linesmen.

Another less commonly used system is the two referee and one linesman system. This system is very close to the regular three-man system except for a few procedure changes.

With the first being the National Hockey League, a number of leagues have started to implement the "four-official system," where an additional referee is added to aid in the calling of penalties normally difficult to assess by one single referee.

Officials are selected by the league they work for. Amateur hockey leagues use guidelines established by national organizing bodies as a basis for choosing their officiating staffs.

In North America, the national organizing bodies Hockey Canada and USA Hockey approve officials according to their experience level as well as their ability to pass rules knowledge and skating ability tests.

Hockey Canada has officiating levels I through VI. Since men's ice hockey is a full contact sport, body checks are allowed so injuries are a common occurrence.

Protective equipment is mandatory and is enforced in all competitive situations. This includes a helmet cage worn if certain age or clear plastic visor can be worn , shoulder pads, elbow pads, mouth guard, protective gloves, heavily padded shorts also known as hockey pants or a girdle, athletic cup also known as a jock, for males; and jill, for females , shin pads, skates, and optionally a neck protector.

Goaltenders use different equipment. Goaltenders wear specialized goalie skates these skates are built more for movement side to side rather than forwards and backwards , a jock or jill, large leg pads there are size restrictions in certain leagues , blocking glove, catching glove, a chest protector, a goalie mask, and a large jersey.

Goaltenders' equipment has continually become larger and larger, leading to fewer goals in each game and many official rule changes.

Hockey skates are optimized for physical acceleration, speed and manoeuvrability. This includes rapid starts, stops, turns, and changes in skating direction.

In addition, they must be rigid and tough to protect the skater's feet from contact with other skaters, sticks, pucks, the boards, and the ice itself.

Rigidity also improves the overall manoeuvrability of the skate. Hockey players usually adjust these parameters based on their skill level, position, and body type.

The hockey stick consists of a long, relatively wide, and slightly curved flat blade, attached to a shaft. The curve itself has a big impact on its performance.

A deep curve allows for lifting the puck easier while a shallow curve allows for easier backhand shots. The flex of the stick also impacts the performance.

Typically, a less flexible stick is meant for a stronger player since the player is looking for the right balanced flex that allows the stick to flex easily while still having a strong "whip-back" which sends the puck flying at high speeds.

It is quite distinct from sticks in other sports games and most suited to hitting and controlling the flat puck. Its unique shape contributed to the early development of the game.

Ice hockey is a full contact sport and carries a high risk of injury. Skate blades, hockey sticks, shoulders, hips, and hockey pucks all contribute.

The types of injuries associated with hockey include: Women's ice hockey players can have contact but are not allowed to body check. Compared to athletes who play other sports, ice hockey players are at higher risk of overuse injuries and injuries caused by early sports specialization by teenagers.

According to the Hughston Health Alert, "Lacerations to the head, scalp, and face are the most frequent types of injury [in hockey].

Most of these injuries are caused by player contact, falls and contact with a puck, high stick and occasionally, a skate blade. Due to the danger of delivering a check from behind, many leagues, including the NHL have made this a major and game misconduct penalty called "boarding".

Another type of check that accounts for many of the player-to-player contact concussions is a check to the head resulting in a misconduct penalty called "head contact".

A check to the head can be defined as delivering a hit while the receiving player's head is down and their waist is bent and the aggressor is targeting the opponent player's head.

The most dangerous result of a head injury in hockey can be classified as a concussion. Most concussions occur during player-to-player contact rather than when a player is checked into the boards.

Concussions that players suffer may go unreported because there is no obvious physical signs if a player is not knocked unconscious.

This can prove to be dangerous if a player decides to return to play without receiving proper medical attention. Studies show that, ice hockey causes Occurrences of death from these injuries are rare, but occur all too much in a variety of sports.

An important defensive tactic is checking—attempting to take the puck from an opponent or to remove the opponent from play. Stick checking , sweep checking , and poke checking are legal uses of the stick to obtain possession of the puck.

The neutral zone trap is designed to isolate the puck carrier in the neutral zone preventing him from entering the offensive zone.

Body checking is using one's shoulder or hip to strike an opponent who has the puck or who is the last to have touched it the last person to have touched the puck is still legally "in possession" of it, although a penalty is generally called if he is checked more than two seconds after his last touch.

Often the term checking is used to refer to body checking, with its true definition generally only propagated among fans of the game.

Offensive tactics include improving a team's position on the ice by advancing the puck out of one's zone towards the opponent's zone, progressively by gaining lines, first your own blue line, then the red line and finally the opponent's blue line.

NHL rules instated for the season redefined the offside rule to make the two-line pass legal; a player may pass the puck from behind his own blue line, past both that blue line and the centre red line, to a player on the near side of the opponents' blue line.

Offensive tactics are designed ultimately to score a goal by taking a shot. When a player purposely directs the puck towards the opponent's goal, he or she is said to "shoot" the puck.

A deflection is a shot that redirects a shot or a pass towards the goal from another player, by allowing the puck to strike the stick and carom towards the goal.

A one-timer is a shot struck directly off a pass, without receiving the pass and shooting in two separate actions. Headmanning the puck , also known as breaking out , is the tactic of rapidly passing to the player farthest down the ice.

Loafing , also known as cherry-picking , is when a player, usually a forward, skates behind an attacking team, instead of playing defence, in an attempt to create an easy scoring chance.

A team that is losing by one or two goals in the last few minutes of play will often elect to pull the goalie ; that is, remove the goaltender and replace him or her with an extra attacker on the ice in the hope of gaining enough advantage to score a goal.

However, it is an act of desperation, as it sometimes leads to the opposing team extending their lead by scoring a goal in the empty net.

One of the most important strategies for a team is their forecheck. Forechecking is the act of attacking the opposition in their defensive zone. Forechecking is an important part of the dump and chase strategy i.

Each team will use their own unique system but the main ones are: The 2—1—2 is the most basic forecheck system where two forwards will go in deep and pressure the opposition's defencemen, the third forward stays high and the two defencemen stay at the blueline.

The 1—2—2 is a bit more conservative system where one forward pressures the puck carrier and the other two forwards cover the oppositions' wingers, with the two defencemen staying at the blueline.

The 1—4 is the most defensive forecheck system, referred to as the neutral zone trap, where one forward will apply pressure to the puck carrier around the oppositions' blueline and the other 4 players stand basically in a line by their blueline in hopes the opposition will skate into one of them.

Another strategy is the left wing lock , which has two forwards pressure the puck and the left wing and the two defencemen stay at the blueline.

There are many other little tactics used in the game of hockey. Cycling moves the puck along the boards in the offensive zone to create a scoring chance by making defenders tired or moving them out of position.

Pinching is when a defenceman pressures the opposition's winger in the offensive zone when they are breaking out, attempting to stop their attack and keep the puck in the offensive zone.

A saucer pass is a pass used when an opposition's stick or body is in the passing lane. It is the act of raising the puck over the obstruction and having it land on a teammate's stick.

A deke , short for "decoy," is a feint with the body or stick to fool a defender or the goalie.

Many modern players, such as Pavel Datsyuk , Sidney Crosby and Patrick Kane , have picked up the skill of "dangling," which is fancier deking and requires more stick handling skills.

Although fighting is officially prohibited in the rules, it is not an uncommon occurrence at the professional level, and its prevalence has been both a target of criticism and a considerable draw for the sport.

At the professional level in North America fights are unofficially condoned. Enforcers and other players fight to demoralize the opposing players while exciting their own, as well as settling personal scores.

A fight will also break out if one of the team's skilled players gets hit hard or someone gets hit by what the team perceives as a dirty hit. The amateur game penalizes fisticuffs more harshly, as a player who receives a fighting major is also assessed at least a minute misconduct penalty NCAA and some Junior leagues or a game misconduct penalty and suspension high school and younger, as well as some casual adult leagues.

Ice hockey is one of the fastest growing women's sports in the world, with the number of participants increasing by percent from to The chief difference between women's and men's ice hockey is that body checking is prohibited in women's hockey.

After the Women's World Championship, body checking was eliminated in women's hockey. In current IIHF women's competition, body checking is either a minor or major penalty , decided at the referee's discretion.

In Canada, to some extent ringette has served as the female counterpart to ice hockey, in the sense that traditionally, boys have played hockey while girls have played ringette.

Women are known to have played the game in the 19th century. Several games were recorded in the s in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

The women of Lord Stanley's family were known to participate in the game of ice hockey on the outdoor ice rink at Rideau Hall , the residence of Canada's Governor-General.

The game developed at first without an organizing body. A tournament in between Montreal and Trois-Rivieres was billed as the first championship tournament.

Several tournaments, such as at the Banff Winter Carnival, were held in the early 20th century and numerous women's teams such as the Seattle Vamps and Vancouver Amazons existed.

Starting in the s, the game spread to universities. Today, the sport is played from youth through adult leagues, and in the universities of North America and internationally.

There are two major women's hockey leagues, the National Women's Hockey League with teams in the Northeastern United States which is a professional league and the Canadian Women's Hockey League with teams in Canada and the United States, which is semi-professional and is developing toward becoming a fully professional league.

The first women's world championship tournament, albeit unofficial, was held in in Toronto , Ontario, Canada. Women's ice hockey was added as a medal sport at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.

The United States won the gold, Canada won the silver and Finland won the bronze medal. With interest in women's ice hockey growing, between and the number of registered female players worldwide grew from , to , The CWHL was founded in and originally consisted of seven teams.

As of , there are six teams, although the teams themselves have changed. The league consists of five teams, though it had four teams for the league's first three seasons.

The NHL is by far the best attended and most popular ice hockey league in the world. The league's history began after Canada's National Hockey Association decided to disband in ; the result was the creation of the National Hockey League.

The league expanded to the United States beginning in In , the NHL doubled in size to 12 teams, undertaking one of the greatest expansions in professional sports history.

A few years later, in , a new 12 team league, the World Hockey Association WHA was formed and due to its ensuing rivalry with the NHL, it caused an escalation in players salaries.

This created a 21 team league. It comprises 30 teams from the United States and Canada, and will expand to 31 teams for the —19 season.

The American Collegiate Hockey Association is composed of college teams at the club level. In Canada, the Canadian Hockey League is an umbrella organization comprising three major junior leagues: It attracts players from Canada, the United States and Europe.

Players in this league are strictly amateur, so that they may play college hockey if they wish. The league is the direct successor to the Russian Super League , which in turn was the successor to the Soviet League , the history of which dates back to the Soviet adoption of ice hockey in the s.

The goaltender wears a specially designed mask often molded to the contours of his face. Over his uniform a goalie wears extra equipment. Pads up to 11 inches They not only afford protection but also aid in blocking shots.

The stick hand is encased in a glove with a wide backing that protects his arm. Fully dressed, goaltenders carry up to 40 pounds 18 kg of equipment.

The modern game on every level—amateur, collegiate , international, and professional—has been influenced largely by the NHL. Checking—body contact to take an opponent out of play—is permitted anywhere on the ice.

In most leagues, including the NHL, players may not make or take a pass that has traveled across the two blue lines; if this occurs, the play is ruled offside.

A face-off, in which an official drops the puck between opposing players, follows the infraction. Face-offs are held at the point of the infraction.

Players who precede the puck into the attacking zone also are ruled offside, and a face-off is held at a face-off spot near the attacking blue line.

A face-off also begins each period and is used as well after a goal and after any stoppage of play. The goalie rarely leaves his goal area. The usual alignments of the other five players are three forwards—the centre, a left wing, and a right wing—and two defensemen—a left defenseman and a right defenseman.

A player may handle the puck as often or as long as he likes, so long as he does not close his glove on the puck or touch the puck with a stick that is higher than shoulder level.

A player may not pass the puck with his open hand. The goalie, however, is generally not subject to these restrictions.

The game is divided into three periods of 20 minutes playing time each, with a minute intermission between periods.

Hockey games may end in a tie unless the rules stipulate an overtime period to serve as a tiebreaker. In the case of a tie in college hockey, one minute sudden-death overtime period is played in regular season play.

NHL teams play a five-minute sudden-death overtime period, followed by a shoot-out if the game remains tied. During the play-offs, college hockey has minute overtime periods until there is a winner, while the NHL has the same system with minute periods.

There is generally no overtime period in international hockey; however, Olympic competition since has had a minute sudden-death period, followed by a shootout if needed.

In organized ice hockey a victory is worth two points in the standings. A tie is worth one point, and the NHL, which has no ties, awards a point to a team that loses in overtime.

A goal counts as a point for the team, but individual points may be awarded to as many as three players for one goal.

Ice hockey is the only major sport in which substitutions are permitted while the game is in play. The game is so fast and so demanding that forwards generally skate only 90 seconds at a time.

Defensemen usually stay on the ice for a slightly longer period of time. Because of the speed and contact, there are many infractions, not all of them having to do with "hitting" penalties.

Icing is not called against a team when it is shorthanded; if the teams are evenhanded or if the offending team has more players than the opposing team, the puck is returned to the defensive zone of the team that iced it for the face-off.

No player, however, may delay the game by intentionally shooting the puck out of the rink or by shifting the goalposts. Minor penalties are most commonly assessed for excessive use of the body or equipment to impede the opposition.

For a minor infraction the offending player must remain in the penalty box at the side of the rink for two minutes while his team plays shorthanded.

This man-advantage situation is called a power play. If the opponents score at any time during the penalty period, the penalized player may return to the ice.

Penalties incurred by the goalie are served by a teammate. A major penalty for violent play results in the loss of a player for five minutes or for the remainder of the game.

If major penalties are incurred simultaneously by both teams, substitutions are made and there is no shorthanded play. A game misconduct penalty for abusing an official results in the loss of a player for 10 minutes; however, a substitution is allowed, and the team does not play shorthanded.

There are three common types of shots in hockey: The slap shot has been timed at more than miles an hour km an hour. The slap shot differs from the wrist shot in that the player brings his stick back until it is nearly perpendicular with the ice and then brings the stick down in an arc, swatting the puck as he follows through.

It is not as accurate as the wrist shot, in which the player puts his stick on the ice near the puck and without a windup snaps his wrist to fire off a shot.

The backhander is taken when the puck goes to the other side of the stick from which the player normally shoots. If he is a right-handed shooter, for example, he takes the backhander from his left side.

It is taken when there is not enough time to shift the puck to his normal shooting position. The backhander generally is not as hard or as accurate as the wrist shot, but it has the advantage of being taken quickly.

Speed is an essential requirement of the game. But contests at all levels became so quick that offensive and defensive roles often are reversed, and defensemen may find themselves at the forefront of the action.

Slower players must have other attributes to make a team; they must, for example, be able to check well, to prevent the other players from getting past them.

But, since everyone on the team handles the puck at some point during a game, a premium is placed on puck-carrying ability.

The man with the puck is in control, and the play can go only so fast as he directs it. Centre Wayne Gretzky , while playing for the Edmonton Oilers , was the dominant scorer in the NHL for most of the s due to his outstanding puck handling and his accurate shooting and passing.

If a forward has the puck, the defensemen trail the play. If a defenseman is leading an offensive thrust, called a "rush," one of the forwards backs him up.

The opposition, meanwhile, attempts to gain control of the puck or to dislodge it. The most common way is for the defending player to poke his stick at the puck.

A defender may also block, check, or hit the player with his body, as long as his action falls within the rules defining allowable contact.

They then can move to the centre to halt a breakthrough or can drive a man into the boards if he attempts to go along the sides. If the attacking players find that they have difficulty in stickhandling past the opposition, they may try a long shot "on goal.

The third forward, meanwhile, takes up a position about 20 feet in front of the goal, in the centre of the ice, in a spot known as the " slot.

The defensemen on the attacking team take up positions on the blue line to prevent the defending team from getting a breakaway.

Often the puck is passed to the defensemen, who shoot from the blue line, 60 feet out, from their position known as the " point.

Many fans do not see goals scored in hockey because so many go in on rebounds or deflections. Any kind of shot that puts in a goal is allowable, unless the shooter has raised his stick above his elbow; but the puck may not be deliberately kicked in, and it cannot be thrown in with the hand.

One of the most unusual spectacles in hockey occurs when a team that is trailing by one goal takes its goaltender out of the net in the final seconds of the game.

All NHL games and most international games are under the control of two referees, two linesmen, and various off-ice officials most collegiate games use only one referee.

Referees are responsible for calling penalties and are the final arbiters of whether a goal has been scored, though the NHL allows officials off ice to review videotape and determine the legality of a goal.

Linesmen call offsides and icing infractions; they may also stop play in order to inform a referee that a team has too many players on the ice.

In some collegiate games in the U. The IIHF sanctions the two-referee system for games under the jurisdiction of national federations.

The goal judges are stationed behind each cage in a raised booth behind the boards, and they flip a switch that stops the clock and triggers a red light when they see the puck cross the goal line.

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Our editors will review what you've submitted, and if it meets our criteria, we'll add it to the article. Please note that our editors may make some formatting changes or correct spelling or grammatical errors, and may also contact you if any clarifications are needed.

Fischler Gerald Eskenazi Shirley W. Sep 28, See Article History. Louis Blues 4—0 —69 Montreal Canadiens St. Louis Blues 4—0 —70 Boston Bruins St.

Learn More in these related Britannica articles: Ice hockey was introduced to Russia only during the Soviet era, yet the national team soon dominated international competitions.

The Soviet squad claimed more than 20 world championships between and The success of the national team can be attributed to both the Soviet….

Ice hockey is also Canadian in tradition and leadership. Its exact origins are disputed; one theory traces hockey to the Irish game of hurling and another to a French field game called hoquet , known in English as field hockey.

The game has spread far afield…. Canadian ice hockey, for example, is more violent in some respects than its Scandinavian counterpart.

The reason for this is that Canadian ice hockey provides a subcultural context in which boys and young men are introduced to highly aggressive behaviour.

In this and in many other…. Especially influential was the first diagnosis of CTE in an American football player, Mike Webster, in the early s. Webster had taken thousands of hits during his career and later suffered from dramatic changes in….

It is played almost exclusively in the Scandinavian countries, the Baltic countries, and Mongolia.

Eldorado casino shreveport den um bis zu 4 Meter kürzeren Spielflächen können nun internationale Spiele stattfinden. Eine Ausnahme bildet der Torhüter: Kurhaus baden-baden casino im Vergleich zu den meisten anderen Sportarten darf sich beim Eishockey auch hinter dem Tor bewegt werden. Bekommt ein Spieler eine Matchstrafedarf er in der Partie nicht mehr auflaufen und wird für mindestens eine weitere gesperrt. Während eines Spiels dürfen sich höchstens 6 Spieler gleichzeitig auf dem Eis befinden. Sperre Matchstrafe — Spielausschluss, mind. Jetzt darf sich zwischen diesem Spieler und dem gegnerischen Tor kein Spieler des Klubs A befinden, wenn er in das Angriffsdrittel eindringt.

regeln ice hockey -

Ein sofortiger Ersatz auf dem Eis ist erlaubt. Der Puck darf nicht aus der eigenen Hälfte über die gegnerische Torlinie gespielt werden, ohne dass ein Spieler die Scheibe berührt. Somit ist das Spiel in Nordamerika in der Regel etwas schneller und aggressiver als in Europa. So wird gewährleistet, dass die Spieler möglichst gut harmonieren. Mit guter Taktik gelang es technisch schwächeren Mannschaften schon oft, gegen talentiertere Teams zu gewinnen. Der Torhüter kann in besonderen Situationen durch einen Feldspieler ersetzt werden. Ein Ersatz auf dem Eis ist in dieser Zeit nicht erlaubt. Bekommt nun ein weiterer Spieler einer Mannschaft später innerhalb dieser zwei Minuten eine Strafe, wird die später aufgestellte Strafe aufgehoben, sobald ein Tor fällt. The league expanded beyond the former Soviet countries beginning in the —12 seasonwith clubs in Croatia and Slovakia. Referees are responsible for calling penalties and sportonline-foto the final arbiters of whether a goal has been scored, though the NHL allows deutsche online spiele off ice to review videotape and determine the legality of a goal. Studies show that, ice hockey causes In college games, the penalty is still enforced even if the team in possession scores. The flex of the stick also impacts the performance. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind. The team that casino do estoril been given a penalty is said to be playing "short-handed" while the opposing team Beste Spielothek in Auel finden on a " power neue gesetze für spielhallen 2019 ". By then, several professional hockey leagues were operating in Canada with leagues in Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Retrieved December 12, Play often proceeds for minutes without interruption.

This experience led him to organize an ongoing effort to ban fighting in the Ontario Hockey League , where the Knights compete, by attempting to gain the support of other school boards and by writing letters to OHL administrators.

The first known death directly related to a hockey fight occurred when Don Sanderson of the Whitby Dunlops , a top-tier senior amateur team in Ontario's Major League Hockey , died in January , a month after sustaining a head injury during a fight: Sanderson's helmet came off during the fight, and when he fell to the ice, he hit his head.

Fighters such as Bob Probert and Boogaard have been posthumously diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy , a degenerative disease of the brain caused by repeated brain trauma.

While the NHL took steps to limit head trauma from blindslide hits, it was criticized for doing nothing to reduce fighting, which consists of repeated deliberate blows to the head.

Beginning in the —17 season, the American Hockey League will impose a fighting major counter, similar to the National Basketball Association 's unsportsmanlike technical foul counter and soccer's accumulated cards.

A player who collects ten major penalties for fighting during the season will be suspended one game, and will be suspended one game for each fighting major for the next three penalties the 11th, 12th, and 13th fighting majors.

A player is suspended two games for his 14th and subsequent major penalty for fighting. If one player involved in the fight is charged with an instigator penalty, the opponent will not have the fighting major count towards suspension.

There are several informal rules governing fighting in ice hockey that players rarely discuss but take quite seriously.

This agreement helps both players avoid being given an instigator penalty, and helps keep unwilling participants out of fights. Enforcers typically only fight each other, with only the occasional spontaneous fight breaking out between one or two opponents who do not usually fight.

Long-standing rivalries result in numerous rematches, especially if one of the enforcers has to decline an invitation to fight during a given game.

This is one of the reasons that enforcers may fight at the beginning of a game, when nothing obvious has happened to agitate the opponents.

Another important aspect of etiquette is simply fighting fairly and cleanly. Fairness is maintained by not wearing equipment that could injure the opposing fighter, such as face shields, gloves, or masks, [] and not assaulting referees or linesmen.

Otherwise, they risk losing the respect of their teammates and fans. Sportsmanship is also an important aspect when it comes to fights.

While an enforcer may start a fight in response to foul play, it is generally not acceptable to start a fight to retaliate against an opponent who scored fairly.

Fighting tactics are governed by several actual rules and enforcers will also adopt informal tactics particular to their style and personality. One tactic adopted by players is known as "going for it", in which the player puts his head down and just throws as many punches as he can, as fast as he can.

In the process, that player takes as many punches as he delivers, although some of them are to the hard forehead. Fighters usually must keep one hand on their opponent's jersey since the ice surface makes maintaining balance very difficult.

For this reason, the majority of a hockey fight consists of the players holding on with one hand and punching with the other.

Other examples include Gordie Howe's tactic of holding the sweater of his opponent right around the armpit of his preferred punching arm so as to impede his movement.

Probert, of the Detroit Red Wings and Chicago Blackhawks , was known to allow his opponents to punch until they showed signs of tiring, at which time he would take over and usually dominate the fight.

Some consider long-time Buffalo Sabres enforcer Rob Ray to be the reason that hockey jerseys are now equipped with tie-down straps "fight straps" that prevent their removal; he would always remove his jersey during fights so his opponents would have nothing to grab on to.

This is commonly referred to as the "Rob Ray Rule". Throughout a game, the referee and linesmen have a role in preventing fights through the way they are managing the game—calling penalties, breaking up scuffles before they escalate, etc.

None of these responsibilities are written in the NHL's rule book, but often are guided by "common sense", according to officials.

In a single fight situation the linesmen will communicate with each other as to which player they will take during the fight, clear out any sticks, gloves, or other equipment that has been dropped and wait for a safe time to enter the fight, which they will do together.

If both players are still standing while the linesmen enter, the linesmen will approach from each side never from behind , bring their arms over the combatants' arms and wrap them around, pushing downwards and breaking the players apart.

If the players have fallen, the linesmen will approach from the side never over the skates , getting in between the two players.

One linesman will use his body to shield the player on the bottom from the other player while his partner will remove the top player from the fight.

Most linesmen will allow a fight to run its course for their own safety, but will enter a fight regardless if one player has gained a significant advantage over his opponent.

Once the players have been broken up, the linesmen then escort the players off the ice. During this time the referee will keep other players from entering the fight by sending them to a neutral area on the ice and then watching the fight and assessing any other penalties that occur.

In a multiple fight situation the linesmen will normally break up fights together, one fight at a time using the same procedures for a single fight.

The linesmen will communicate with each other which fight to break up. The referee will not normally break up a fight unless the linesmen need assistance, or a fight is occurring where a player has gained a significant advantage over the other player, leading to concerns of significant injury.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about condoned fighting in ice hockey. For disallowed violent acts, see Violence in ice hockey.

Retrieved 25 August Canucks players agree with commissioner about the role of fisticuffs". Retrieved 27 March Archived from the original on 22 February Retrieved 19 June Retrieved 17 June Retrieved 18 June Retrieved 25 June Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum.

Retrieved 21 June The Making of Slap Shot: Retrieved 22 June Archived from the original on 19 June Retrieved 30 October Retrieved 15 April Archived from the original on 4 March Retrieved 24 March Retrieved 2 July Archived from the original on 29 September Retrieved 16 April Retrieved 29 December Retrieved 24 December Retrieved 9 January Retrieved 30 June Retrieved 25 April Retrieved 7 December Retrieved 15 January Retrieved 9 April The New York Times.

Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine. Archived from the original PDF on Let's drop the gloves". The Globe and Mail. Fighting not necessary for hockey.

Courier Press Wallaceburg, Ontario. Retrieved 26 January Retrieved 24 June Retrieved 8 January Pat 6 January Fighting has no place in hockey".

Archived from the original on 21 January Retrieved 7 January Part 3 of a three-part series chronicling Boogard's life and the posthumous research on his brain.

Retrieved 5 December Retrieved 22 July NHL wants linesmen to break up more fights before they start". Retrieved 4 July Retrieved 15 July International Ice Hockey Federation.

Retrieved 2 March The Rites of Men: Manhood, Politics, and the Culture of Sport. University of Toronto Press.

Detroit Red Wings v. Goldschmied, Nadav; Espindola, Samantha The Economics of Sports". Should It Be Banned? Journal of Sport and Social Issues.

McCarty, Darren; Allen, Kevin The NHL suspended play for a period of 16 days in so professional players could make their Olympic debut in Nagano , Japan , and it continued to temporarily stop the season for Olympic play thereafter.

Though considered a male sport, hockey has been played by women for over years. The first all-female game was in Barrie, Ontario, Canada, in , and the first world championship was held in NHL hockey is typically played on a standard-size rink shaped like a round-cornered rectangle that is feet 61 metres long and 85 feet 26 metres wide.

International rinks are usually — feet by 85—98 feet, and U. The goal cage is 4 feet 1. Any shot that completely clears the goal line, a 2-inch- 5-cm- wide stripe on the ice across the front of the cage, is a goal.

In front of the goal is the crease , a semicircular area that corresponds to a circle with a 6-foot radius, demarcated by a red line.

When the goalie is in the crease, no attacking player may enter unless the puck is there as well; if the goalie is not in the crease, however, anyone may enter.

The blue lines that divide the ice into three zones are 60 feet 18 metres out from the goal line and are painted across the width of the ice.

The area between the blue lines is called the neutral zone. This zone is bisected by the red centre line. Virtually all equipment—for children, amateurs, or professionals—is the same.

Made of vulcanized rubber , the puck is 1 inch 2. Hockey sticks, once made from wood, are now formed from a variety of materials. Rules are enforced limiting the size of the stick and the curvature of its blade.

Forwards and defensemen wear the same type of skates, but goaltenders have flatter blades because they need more balance and are stationary for longer periods.

Players wear padding under their uniforms to protect legs, shoulders, and arms. The goaltender wears a specially designed mask often molded to the contours of his face.

Over his uniform a goalie wears extra equipment. Pads up to 11 inches They not only afford protection but also aid in blocking shots. The stick hand is encased in a glove with a wide backing that protects his arm.

Fully dressed, goaltenders carry up to 40 pounds 18 kg of equipment. The modern game on every level—amateur, collegiate , international, and professional—has been influenced largely by the NHL.

Checking—body contact to take an opponent out of play—is permitted anywhere on the ice. In most leagues, including the NHL, players may not make or take a pass that has traveled across the two blue lines; if this occurs, the play is ruled offside.

A face-off, in which an official drops the puck between opposing players, follows the infraction. Face-offs are held at the point of the infraction.

Players who precede the puck into the attacking zone also are ruled offside, and a face-off is held at a face-off spot near the attacking blue line.

A face-off also begins each period and is used as well after a goal and after any stoppage of play. The goalie rarely leaves his goal area.

The usual alignments of the other five players are three forwards—the centre, a left wing, and a right wing—and two defensemen—a left defenseman and a right defenseman.

A player may handle the puck as often or as long as he likes, so long as he does not close his glove on the puck or touch the puck with a stick that is higher than shoulder level.

A player may not pass the puck with his open hand. The goalie, however, is generally not subject to these restrictions.

The game is divided into three periods of 20 minutes playing time each, with a minute intermission between periods.

Hockey games may end in a tie unless the rules stipulate an overtime period to serve as a tiebreaker.

In the case of a tie in college hockey, one minute sudden-death overtime period is played in regular season play.

NHL teams play a five-minute sudden-death overtime period, followed by a shoot-out if the game remains tied. During the play-offs, college hockey has minute overtime periods until there is a winner, while the NHL has the same system with minute periods.

There is generally no overtime period in international hockey; however, Olympic competition since has had a minute sudden-death period, followed by a shootout if needed.

In organized ice hockey a victory is worth two points in the standings. A tie is worth one point, and the NHL, which has no ties, awards a point to a team that loses in overtime.

A goal counts as a point for the team, but individual points may be awarded to as many as three players for one goal. Ice hockey is the only major sport in which substitutions are permitted while the game is in play.

The game is so fast and so demanding that forwards generally skate only 90 seconds at a time. Defensemen usually stay on the ice for a slightly longer period of time.

Because of the speed and contact, there are many infractions, not all of them having to do with "hitting" penalties.

Icing is not called against a team when it is shorthanded; if the teams are evenhanded or if the offending team has more players than the opposing team, the puck is returned to the defensive zone of the team that iced it for the face-off.

No player, however, may delay the game by intentionally shooting the puck out of the rink or by shifting the goalposts. Minor penalties are most commonly assessed for excessive use of the body or equipment to impede the opposition.

For a minor infraction the offending player must remain in the penalty box at the side of the rink for two minutes while his team plays shorthanded.

This man-advantage situation is called a power play. If the opponents score at any time during the penalty period, the penalized player may return to the ice.

Penalties incurred by the goalie are served by a teammate. A major penalty for violent play results in the loss of a player for five minutes or for the remainder of the game.

If major penalties are incurred simultaneously by both teams, substitutions are made and there is no shorthanded play.

A game misconduct penalty for abusing an official results in the loss of a player for 10 minutes; however, a substitution is allowed, and the team does not play shorthanded.

There are three common types of shots in hockey: The slap shot has been timed at more than miles an hour km an hour.

The slap shot differs from the wrist shot in that the player brings his stick back until it is nearly perpendicular with the ice and then brings the stick down in an arc, swatting the puck as he follows through.

It is not as accurate as the wrist shot, in which the player puts his stick on the ice near the puck and without a windup snaps his wrist to fire off a shot.

The backhander is taken when the puck goes to the other side of the stick from which the player normally shoots. If he is a right-handed shooter, for example, he takes the backhander from his left side.

It is taken when there is not enough time to shift the puck to his normal shooting position. The backhander generally is not as hard or as accurate as the wrist shot, but it has the advantage of being taken quickly.

Speed is an essential requirement of the game. But contests at all levels became so quick that offensive and defensive roles often are reversed, and defensemen may find themselves at the forefront of the action.

Slower players must have other attributes to make a team; they must, for example, be able to check well, to prevent the other players from getting past them.

But, since everyone on the team handles the puck at some point during a game, a premium is placed on puck-carrying ability. The man with the puck is in control, and the play can go only so fast as he directs it.

Centre Wayne Gretzky , while playing for the Edmonton Oilers , was the dominant scorer in the NHL for most of the s due to his outstanding puck handling and his accurate shooting and passing.

If a forward has the puck, the defensemen trail the play. If a defenseman is leading an offensive thrust, called a "rush," one of the forwards backs him up.

The opposition, meanwhile, attempts to gain control of the puck or to dislodge it. The most common way is for the defending player to poke his stick at the puck.

A defender may also block, check, or hit the player with his body, as long as his action falls within the rules defining allowable contact.

They then can move to the centre to halt a breakthrough or can drive a man into the boards if he attempts to go along the sides.

If the attacking players find that they have difficulty in stickhandling past the opposition, they may try a long shot "on goal. The third forward, meanwhile, takes up a position about 20 feet in front of the goal, in the centre of the ice, in a spot known as the " slot.

The defensemen on the attacking team take up positions on the blue line to prevent the defending team from getting a breakaway. Often the puck is passed to the defensemen, who shoot from the blue line, 60 feet out, from their position known as the " point.

Many fans do not see goals scored in hockey because so many go in on rebounds or deflections. Any kind of shot that puts in a goal is allowable, unless the shooter has raised his stick above his elbow; but the puck may not be deliberately kicked in, and it cannot be thrown in with the hand.

One of the most unusual spectacles in hockey occurs when a team that is trailing by one goal takes its goaltender out of the net in the final seconds of the game.

All NHL games and most international games are under the control of two referees, two linesmen, and various off-ice officials most collegiate games use only one referee.

Referees are responsible for calling penalties and are the final arbiters of whether a goal has been scored, though the NHL allows officials off ice to review videotape and determine the legality of a goal.

Linesmen call offsides and icing infractions; they may also stop play in order to inform a referee that a team has too many players on the ice.

In some collegiate games in the U. The IIHF sanctions the two-referee system for games under the jurisdiction of national federations.

The goal judges are stationed behind each cage in a raised booth behind the boards, and they flip a switch that stops the clock and triggers a red light when they see the puck cross the goal line.

We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind.

Your contribution may be further edited by our staff, and its publication is subject to our final approval. Unfortunately, our editorial approach may not be able to accommodate all contributions.

Our editors will review what you've submitted, and if it meets our criteria, we'll add it to the article.

Juli um In der ersten Runde trifft die nach dem Grunddurchgang am besten platzierte Mannschaft gegen die am schlechtesten platzierte, die zweitbeste auf die zweitschlechteste usw. Das Werfen des Pucks, wenn dieser in der Hand eingeschlossen ist, wird bestraft. Zu Spielbeginn oder nach einem Tor übernimmt der Hauptschiedsrichter den Bully. Sieht der Schiedsrichter ein Foul, zeigt er das durch Heben des Arms an, das Spiel läuft jedoch so lange weiter, bis die Mannschaft, gegen die die Strafe ausgesprochen wird, in Puck-Besitz gelangt. Diese Spieler übernehmen quasi die Rolle des Bodyguards , indem sie die besten Spieler der Mannschaft oder die Torhüter vor überharten Angriffen schützen und sich immer wieder in eine Schlägerei verwickeln. Querlinie sind die Torlinien über das gesamte Feld durchgezogen rot, Breite: Näheres hierzu unter Overtime. Dabei darf die Mannschaft mit einer Überzahl dem Gegner höchstens mit zwei Feldspielern auf der Eisfläche überlegen sein, zumal sich getreu Regeln immer mindestens drei Feldspieler pro Team auf dem Eis befinden müssen. Somit entsteht meistens eine 5 gegen 4 Spielsituation Power-Play. In diesem Fall wird 4 gegen 4 gespielt und beide Strafen laufen auf der Uhr. Die Eishockeyregeln sind im offiziellen Regelbuch engl. Die Tore sind cm hoch und cm breit, die Torstangen sind rot gefärbt.

Ice hockey regeln -

Trash talk Deftigerer Wortwechsel zwischen zwei gegnerischen Spielern , mit dem Ziel, den anderen zu provozieren oder in seiner Konzentration zu stören. Das Spiel läuft jedoch so lange weiter, bis die Mannschaft, gegen die die Strafe ausgesprochen wird, in Puck-Besitz gelangt. Gegliedert wird es durch fünf Querlinien:. Verlassen alle Angreifer das Angriffsviertel ohne den Puck zu berühren, kann das Abseits aufgehoben werden. Was Sie wissen müssen - Wer mitreden will, sollte sich auch mit den Zonen, Abseits und unerlaubtem Weitschuss auskennen. Diese entsteht, wenn gegen ein Team nach einer regelwidrigen Handlung eine Zeitstrafe von mindestens 2 Minuten ausgesprochen wird und der schuldige Spieler auf die Strafbank muss. Anspielpunkte Auf dem Spielfeld gibt es insgesamt neun Anspielpunkte oder -kreise, auch Bullykreise genannt.

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